Audiences need to recognise that there are 'other' histories other than those taught and valued from the western perspectives. This trend however can continue only from a position of a widespread systematic review of the curriculum, and that cant happen without a decolonised institution. 

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ARTIST STATEMENT

London-born, UK based Sculptor, living and working in London.

My practice exposes / articulates the black body laid bare - in traction, unencumbered; motivated by issues inherent to the African diaspora and the Black body - including issues of invisibility versus hyper- visibility, blackness and the notion of the 'body ‘politić’ - seeking an elevation of the black form. By fuelling a discussion of the irregular position of the black-artist, abstracted and marginalised in a male, pale, and stale, whitewashed art-world who seek to modify long-standing institutional narratives and negating stagnant, collective terms of reference(s); it is this ideological positioning that I hope to question within my practice, reconstructing the persisting 'outsider' status whilst scrutinising the fragile balance-power relationships.

My work explores the playful theatricality of sculpture, examining the space between objects modelling the real and its ability to usurp the ‘original’ as self-sustaining fictions.  Alongside sculptural and curatorial considerations - more specifically its critical and vital relationship with space in its pursuit of ‘presence’ - this has seen my work becoming embedded in the everyday, collective experience; presenting objects that become smaller parts of a larger installations that are explicit in their political undertones and personal narrative commentary, whilst polarised by their more covert, playful and subtle methods of installation and display. 

It is in this duality that a strict contextual change occurs - where the human anatomy is reinterpreted and transformed in a new form of hybrid realism – abstracted from its normative function to the point of the grotesque. The resulting clinical ‘dead’ look evokes a morbid curiosity that surrounds the sculpture, shifting expectations of the formal arrangement of figuration by questioning traditional self-representational practices. 

Here the insatiability of self-referential questioning births a hyper-reality in which authenticity & criticality can be located (in), presenting a welcomed opportunity to break free from reference once and for all.